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Study Shows General Happiness Increases with Age

Barry Kornfeld

Financial advisor Barry M. Kornfeld is the co-owner of Boca Raton, Florida-based First Financial Tax Group. Outside of his professional life, Barry Kornfeld enjoys learning about the psychology of aging by reading books on the subject.

In August 2016, the Los Angeles Times reported findings of a new study conducted on the psychology of aging Americans. The results of a survey taken by over 1,500 people showed that the older a person is, the more likely he or she is to feel content in life. All respondents were between the ages of 21 and 99, and those at the youngest end of the spectrum reported higher levels of negative emotions like stress and depression. The correlation between age and contentedness continued to rise as a person’s age did, leading researchers to conclude that the older a person is, the higher his or her level of general happiness is likely to be.

Past studies have shown that emotions like happiness or feeling content can actually have a positive impact on a person’s lifespan. A 30-year study from the University of North Carolina indicates that those who considered themselves to be cheerful lived longer despite differences in health, marital status, or monetary situation.

Financial advisor Barry M. Kornfeld is the co-owner of Boca Raton, Florida-based First Financial Tax Group. Outside of his professional life, Barry Kornfeld enjoys learning about the psychology of aging by reading books on the subject.

In August 2016, the Los Angeles Times reported findings of a new study conducted on the psychology of aging Americans. The results of a survey taken by over 1,500 people showed that the older a person is, the more likely he or she is to feel content in life. All respondents were between the ages of 21 and 99, and those at the youngest end of the spectrum reported higher levels of negative emotions like stress and depression. The correlation between age and contentedness continued to rise as a person’s age did, leading researchers to conclude that the older a person is, the higher his or her level of general happiness is likely to be.
Past studies have shown that emotions like happiness or feeling content can actually have a positive impact on a person’s lifespan. A 30-year study from the University of North Carolina indicates that those who considered themselves to be cheerful lived longer despite differences in health, marital status, or monetary situation.

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